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bswingler
05-01-2010, 16:47
Hi guys, Just to introduce myself I am another student from the University of East Anglia studying WWII bomb storage in a Landscape Archaeological context. In my third year I did a lot of work on Hockering and am now just completing my Masters on FADs in general.

I have a few general queries which I'll post later if anyone can help but for starters, does anyone know roughly how Market Stainton was laid out? I know it comprised approximately 60 miles of roadside storage but I have been unable to locate a site plan and have no idea exactly where this was.

Ben

NJR
05-01-2010, 22:21
Hi Ben, Carnaby will be along shortly...........

Welcome to AiX by the way.

PETERTHEEATER
06-01-2010, 08:03
Hee Hee!

Carnaby
06-01-2010, 12:34
From my notes:


In January 1943 Norton Disney opened an advanced sub-site which could provide for the new airfields under construction in the west of the county, such as Kelstern, Spilsby and Ludford Magna. Parented by the nearest local station, Wickenby, the depot was known as 93 MSU Market Stainton, and comprised many miles of second class roads capable of storing some 20,000 tons of bombs in the area surrounding the village. Being in the middle of heavy bomber country business was brisk and to relieve pressure on 93 MU, Market Stainton became a full Forward Ammunition Depot in its own right in June 1943, and was renumbered 233 MU. The railheads for the unit were the stations at Withcall, East Barkwith, Hallington and Donington and an accommodation and admin site was constructed in the village opposite Market Stainton Hall, south of the Stenigot Road. Satellite depots opened at Wragby and Orby and the principal chemical weapons site was located at Green Lane, a 3 mile long wide verged road NE of the village of Hemingby.In 1947 233 MU had by far the largest roadside stocks in the UK.

Never found a site plan - I guess it was just the admin site with miles of roads. I've a feeling there was a 'standard' squash court on the admin site.

Graham

bswingler
06-01-2010, 13:10
Thanks for this, has cleared up a few points!

Very frustrating that no site plan seems to exist but I'm assuming that as it was a satellite to Norton Disney so this may be the reason. From my research so far it seems a lot of satellites don't have them particularly if they were primarily roadside storage. The impression I get is Market Stainton as an FAD seems to have been constructed in a piecemeal fashion as well without any definite plans from the offset i.e. it just became an FAD due to a lack of suitable sites and the desperate need for storage space and so just kept expanding. Although I may be wrong!

The only thing I would add is that Market Stainton's Op Log at TNA states that 'Site and Road Sign Post Scheme Completed. Map showing Main Site Road, Access and Exit Roads (numbered) and Site Offices sent to each Operational Station with individual instructions as to what numbered roads to follow 'In' and Out' 7/2/43

Thus, presumably some sort of plan did exist however I have yet to find one in any of the nearby airfield's operations logs.

Ben

Carnaby
06-01-2010, 15:12
... it just became an FAD due to a lack of suitable sites and the desperate need for storage space and so just kept expanding. Although I may be wrong!

My thoughts too.

Graham

Peter Kirk
06-01-2010, 16:39
An aerial photograph might yield more, providing English Heritage have one taken at the right time in 1945 to 1947.

Carnaby
06-01-2010, 20:51
An aerial photograph might yield more, providing English Heritage have one taken at the right time in 1945 to 1947.

Agreed. Seems to be something here (http://wtp2.appspot.com/wheresthepath.htm?lat=53.30399876204749&lon=-0.15393036769119187&gz=18&oz=9&gt=1)

I was told that some huts further up the road were the remains of a PoW camp, but I can't find any evidence from web lists. Can't locate the huts today.

Graham

Peter Kirk
06-01-2010, 23:30
Yes. That little bit of concrete with building alongside it and the "screwhead" ending is a good indication. Anyone know why concrete paths were terminated in this way?

PETERTHEEATER
07-01-2010, 05:52
In explosive stores, including airfield bomb stores, the road leading up to cul-de-sac buildings such as Component stores were wide enough only for one way traffic so a truck or tractor trailer combination had to have a reversing area to turn around and get back out. Saves on concrete!

Note the trace of a disused railway 1.25 miles due north. There was probably a rail-head here used to load/unload munitions and truck them to the depot. In my opinion it would have been here:

http://wtp2.appspot.com/wheresthepath.htm?lat=53.31885781727696&lon=-0.13858437538146973&gz=17&oz=8&gt=1

Peter Kirk
09-01-2010, 17:42
There was indeed a sidings there. Built over in the mid 70s

NJR
11-01-2010, 18:23
Yes. That little bit of concrete with building alongside it and the "screwhead" ending is a good indication. Anyone know why concrete paths were terminated in this way?

This is the building:

http://images.fotopic.net/ytn5m3.jpg

http://images.fotopic.net/ytn5mc.jpg

http://images.fotopic.net/ytn5m8.jpg

NJR

Roy Smart
11-01-2010, 18:55
Hi guys, Just to introduce myself I am another student from the University of East Anglia studying WWII bomb storage in a Landscape Archaeological context. In my third year I did a lot of work on Hockering and am now just completing my Masters on FADs in general.

I have a few general queries which I'll post later if anyone can help but for starters, does anyone know roughly how Market Stainton was laid out? I know it comprised approximately 60 miles of roadside storage but I have been unable to locate a site plan and have no idea exactly where this was.

Ben

Hi, I have just joined the site, so/ new at this. For your information I served at Stainton in August 1947 (bad winter) until closer in 1948, Are you still seeking information ?. ROY

WJT
11-01-2010, 19:58
Welcome aboard, Roy. I think the floor is yours. Anything and everything.

Ossington_2008
11-01-2010, 20:28
I distinctly remember saving a couple of exposures when flying over this area, but I couldn't find anything sufficiently Bomb Store shaped to photograph with any conviction, so I aimed at the Stenigot radar masts instead. (See Stenigot Thread)
The radar site is just NE of the railway line, marked as a tower on the map.
FWIW, Bomber County A History of the RAF In Lincolnshire ihas the store at 230802.
Oh for a RSP!

Carnaby
11-01-2010, 22:31
This is the building:
That's the building I was informed was part of the PoW camp. I'm confident 'they' were wrong.

Graham

PETERTHEEATER
12-01-2010, 07:12
Welcome Roy,

you will need a good memory but, for starters:

1. Can you identify the function of the building in the image above?

2. Can you confirm that there was a railhead at the station just to the NNE?

3. Was storage in the open when you were there or in hutting?