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PETERTHEEATER
31-01-2010, 08:21
My working life in the RAF started in Gaydon type hangars but, in the mid 60s I was exposed to the C Types at Debden.

At that time, I was not particularly interested in hangar lighting which provided a general background level of light the actual job being lit by 'wander lights' as required.

I recall that the C type lighting was a mix of Mercury Vapour and Tungsten units which I later found was to give a 'mix' of light colour temperature to enable more accurate rendition of colours. Typically, this might prevent an aircraft electricians from incorrectly connecting colour coded wiring because he saw red as yellow.

As far as I remember, the actual light fittings were suspended from the roof girders and could be lowered down to floor level on a suspension cable via a wall mounted hand operated winch.

The lampshades were large diameter circular dish type painted (I think) a crappy green on the upper surface and white on the internal reflector surface. I later found that they were solid spun copper which came in useful when 'taking into safe custody' units found extant at disused airfields when on my Bomb Disposal travels.

So, after my preamble, what can you tell me about the actual WW2 standard of the main lighting of Type C's?

WJT
31-01-2010, 11:50
Peter: I can't add anything about WW2 lighting but I can pick up on your points above.

Mercury vapour and tungsten lighting was very expensive to run and at Honington in 1971 a trial was carried out on converting the lights to low pressure sodium. This form of lighting is very yellow and it was decided to do a trial to see exactly what the effects of the change would be. I know the Leckies and the Fairies had to carry out a number of wiring jobs under the new light and I suppose that everything was OK because gradually the hangars went over to LPS. Not sure what they use now, though.

historymadd
31-01-2010, 12:13
Peter: I can't add anything about WW2 lighting but I can pick up on your points above.

Mercury vapour and tungsten lighting was very expensive to run and at Honington in 1971 a trial was carried out on converting the lights to low pressure sodium. This form of lighting is very yellow and it was decided to do a trial to see exactly what the effects of the change would be. I know the Leckies and the Fairies had to carry out a number of wiring jobs under the new light and I suppose that everything was OK because gradually the hangars went over to LPS. Not sure what they use now, though.


hi there

we still use LPS lighting with white lamps and orange high bay lighting for f hanger at abingdon, this can be seen for a good few miles even from the a34 on a dark winter evening.

dont forget the humble five foot flourescent

cheers
historymadd

PJH
01-02-2010, 14:58
As far as I remember, the actual light fittings were suspended from the roof girders and could be lowered down to floor level on a suspension cable via a wall mounted hand operated winch.



Well that answers something that's puzzled me for years. The Cranfield Type C I work in has a number of these small winch units on the wall and I've never been able to figure out what they're for. At last I'll be able to sleep tonight... :D

Peter

PETERTHEEATER
02-02-2010, 08:03
The wonders of AiX! One satisfied customer even if I'm still up in the air.

Strip fluorescent lighting was common in Type C Annexes used as workshops but it was a post was conversion from tungsten. My query concerns the 'roof' lighting in the main hangar aircraft workspace. As I said, it was not something I was interested in when I actually worked in hangars - keeping warm was more important - but now that these old structures are threatened and we are trying to record details for posterity (!), the service utilities are suddenly interesting.

There would have been detailed schedules and drawings for the electrical installations so it looks like a TNA search for relevant documents.

Thanks for the inputs.

PS: PJH, can you get a close-up picture of a winch unit? Or does anyone have one?

WJT
02-02-2010, 11:19
Back in 1971, again whilst at Honington, 'they' decided to rewire the flouescent tube lights in our hangar's annexes. The contractors were doing this work during weekdays and at weekends, so the Key Orderly had to open the hangar for them on Saturday and Sunday and then stay in the control office until they left at night.

When it was my turn to spend the weekend staring at the walls, I was able to 'liberate' a couple of the old light units which were being skipped after replacement with more modern units. The lights in my garage still work fine, all these years later, with their original flourescent tubes and even the starters.

sailormoon_01_uk
02-02-2010, 19:01
Are Aircraft Hangers Lit using High Pressure Sodium Lamps, they produce a golden yellow/white Colour, where Colour is important (say wher Aircraft Maintanence, repairs are taken place Metal Halide Lamps are used, as they give a cold crisp white light similar to daylight from 250 watts to 1000 watts, depending how big the hangers are

All the Best

Colin

historymadd
12-02-2010, 20:47
Well that answers something that's puzzled me for years. The Cranfield Type C I work in has a number of these small winch units on the wall and I've never been able to figure out what they're for. At last I'll be able to sleep tonight... :D

Peter

hi theere
these now are so old that all lights have to changed using a mepw

mobile elevated plat form
an old cherry picker to use old uns lol

cheers

historymadd
28-02-2010, 21:52
Back in 1971, again whilst at Honington, 'they' decided to rewire the flouescent tube lights in our hangar's annexes. The contractors were doing this work during weekdays and at weekends, so the Key Orderly had to open the hangar for them on Saturday and Sunday and then stay in the control office until they left at night.

When it was my turn to spend the weekend staring at the walls, I was able to 'liberate' a couple of the old light units which were being skipped after replacement with more modern units. The lights in my garage still work fine, all these years later, with their original flourescent tubes and even the starters.

hi there
just out of interest were they Cippler fitting which could be un plug dropped down and refitted with out having to chaange the wiring ?

found some in a hanger at abingdon last year ?

cheers
hm