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NJR
27-02-2010, 18:47
Where was the location of this landing ground within Weston Park? Also does anyone know if the Robin hangar disguised as a gamekeepers cottage still stands? Photo below.

http://i159.photobucket.com/albums/t145/ryan7480_bucket/wp.jpg

NJR

Paul Francis
27-02-2010, 20:56
We have pictures of the watch office / MAP office in the archives but not the Robin

Lincolnshire Poacher
27-02-2010, 21:31
If it is of any help, I have visited Weston Park many times in the last ten years, but I have seen no evidence of the Robin.

manda
27-02-2010, 21:34
i've seen some great pillbox disguises but that is fantastic, complete with pretend chimneys as well. That would probably confuse me if i was looking at it on an aerial photograph...

Dave Smith
27-02-2010, 22:40
Definitely not there any more! That photo came from a PRO/TNA file which had pics of Robins disguised as rural garages complete with petrol pumps, and several other imaginative designs. I may have a file number somewhere. At Moreton Corbet, near RAF Shawbury, is a surviving Robin painted up with half-timbering to match many of the buildings in the village, windows, doors etc. There is a pic in AS3 but the paintwork is badly faded now. It is quite a distance from the airfield but there was a lengthy taxi-track.

PNK
08-09-2012, 17:17
This is the aerial posted in the Quiz thread. I'll leave Carnaby to explain he landing aids but they are connected to he FAA use.

Carnaby
08-09-2012, 22:29
Re the above photo - PNK noted the strange white cross about 40 % up from the bottom and 20% across from the left. It reminded me of an SBA plinth (example at Snitterfield, Post #7 (http://www.airfieldinformationexchange.org/community/showthread.php?4603-Snitterfield). However there would be no use for such a device at an SLG. Most of the aircraft at this particular site wouldn't possess the equipment, and I think it highly unlikely that any ATA pilot would be trained in its use.

However a glance at Action Stations Vol.3 revealed all. From early 1944 Weston Park had a dual role. It became HMS Godwit II, i.e. a satellite of RNAS Hinstock which was the navy's instrument flying school some 12 miles to the NNE. That station had problems as its blind approach beam was very close to that used by RAF Peplow. (A quick check reveals that the beams ran almost parallel under one mile apart.) Hence the FAA needed an alternate site where they could practice blind landing, and Weston Park fitted the bill.