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View Full Version : 32 seat BEDFORD BUS 1964 (ish)



PETERTHEEATER
13-05-2010, 08:43
http://i329.photobucket.com/albums/l366/PRACHUAP/SH_121.jpg

Paul Francis
13-05-2010, 08:54
Excellent photo Peter

PETERTHEEATER
13-05-2010, 08:57
I keep finding 'em!

kebecker
13-05-2010, 12:09
Judging by your other posts today looks like you have caught up with a box full of your old piccies

PNK
13-05-2010, 12:47
The BD tour bus? I assume the red wheel rims were to signify bomb disposal as we used to see them on Land Rovers a lot in the 60 and I think 70s. UXBs were quite common then. Our loacla TA regiment is Bomb Disposal and they have a portable display of ordnance they commonly deal with.

I think 1964 was the year I got my first Airfix kit and started my aviation related interests. I was 8 years old! Got extra presents that year because Mum was in hospital with TB.

PETERTHEEATER
14-05-2010, 08:14
Not a tour bus but a workhorse. If the prior reconnoitre indicated fair access then we took the bus plus a 4 x 4. More room and marginally more comfortable than being pitched around in the back of a Bedford RL or 100 inch LWB Land Rover with a 10 cwt Sankey trailer in tow.

PETERTHEEATER
14-05-2010, 08:31
...and a 110 inch LWB Land-Rover with Sankey trailer

http://i329.photobucket.com/albums/l366/PRACHUAP/SH_043.jpg

EDIT:

Mmm. These come out a lot darker than my original. Looks like I need to do some 'doctoring' before posting.

ted angus
14-05-2010, 10:29
Obviously a section outing to the beach !! My son is currentlt scanning thousands of family slides charting our travels over the years, he is having exactly the same problem. I will do a model of that is it a station waggon body ?/ or a 3 door, tropical roof no doubt a diesel max speed 10 knots ??

PETERTHEEATER
15-05-2010, 06:53
No Ted, a five door 9 seater (Ha!), station wagon body, with 4 cylinder petrol engine. The pic was taken a Pembrey in 1966 when we were doing the clearance of the old range so sand bashing in 4 wheel low ratio was the norm plus sand tracks and shovels when it got tough. When going back to base fully loaded (trailer and all) at the weekends we had to go through Monmouth and one hill required us to take it in first gear low ratio to make it over the top!

ted angus
15-05-2010, 10:52
DOUUUUU ! there was a choice of 2 !! if it had been one of the deisels you could have been in 1st gear for the whole journey.
cheers TED
p s keep safe

canberra
15-05-2010, 13:00
And Ive a question, not about the vehicle or where the pic was taken, its about shirts!

I know this is an airfield thread but when did the RAF start getting collar attached shirts issued? I was told it was the late sixties but the chap who is correctly wearing his shirt has one with collar attached. And as for the chap without his shirt on well the old sweats I used to work with were always going on about standards and sunburn being a chargeable offence!

ted angus
15-05-2010, 16:53
And Ive a question, not about the vehicle or where the pic was taken, its about shirts!

I know this is an airfield thread but when did the RAF start getting collar attached shirts issued? I was told it was the late sixties but the chap who is correctly wearing his shirt has one with collar attached. And as for the chap without his shirt on well the old sweats I used to work with were always going on about standards and sunburn being a chargeable offence!

My first ride on one of those Bedford buses was on 6 sept 1964 from weston station to Locking the next day after swearing the old oath bit we got 1 long sleeved collar attached shirt. 2 collar less shirts and 4 collars . All the shirts were the same material, but my collars were by Van Heusen and were a lighter blue than the shirts and had the trendy long collar tabs. We were only allowed to wear the collar attached shirt in shirt sleeve order don't ask me why I haven't a clue . However and Peter might remember, there was another type of collar attached shirt made out of a thicker material, the mountain rescue boys had them I am wondering if the shirt in Peter's picture was one of those as I know the shirt in question was issue to certain trades for work wear. In GEF if you worked on the line teams we got the leather jerkins, wooly pullies with a string in the neck, the sea boot socks and the trog boots with screw on commando soles


TED

canberra
15-05-2010, 18:06
Ah the strange anomalies of dress regualtions, at one time you couldnt wear shirt sleeve order after 1800. I know cos I got told off shall we say! However this airman did some checking and found out it was nonsense, never got an apology though!

PETERTHEEATER
16-05-2010, 04:29
Doesn't that do something to the fuel economy??

PETERTHEEATER
16-05-2010, 04:37
We also had one of these but didn't take ours (not required). This one belonged to the new range up-beach to the north. The limit on ours was that it could (should!) only be driven by a Class A Driver which meant having an RAF MT Driver tradesman with us. Too easy to roll one of these contraptions on a slope.

88 inch SWB Lard Rover with Cuthbertson tracked conversion kit:

http://i329.photobucket.com/albums/l366/PRACHUAP/SH_042.jpg

canberra
16-05-2010, 10:05
I had seen pics of that type of landrover, never knew that they had actually ever made it in to production though.

ted angus
16-05-2010, 10:07
Ah the strange anomalies of dress regualtions, at one time you couldnt wear shirt sleeve order after 1800. I know cos I got told off shall we say! However this airman did some checking and found out it was nonsense, never got an apology though!

It was still the case at Leuchars in 2004 when I gave the SWO my copy of the dress regs and told him to get a bloody grip !!!!!

TED

canberra
16-05-2010, 10:22
You should try working in a army brigade HQ Ted. I never knew there were so many different types of dress in the forces!

PETERTHEEATER
16-05-2010, 10:23
I had seen pics of that type of landrover, never knew that they had actually ever made it in to production though.

The Land Rover was bog standard. To fit the tracks the vehicle was jacked up, road wheels removed and sprockets fitted then the vehicle lifted with a crane and lowered onto the tracks and comnnected. Had to be used in 4WD all the time and, I think, low ratios. Our BD specimen was kept ready to go in it's own garage at Bicester (former Fuel Tanker park) and was driven onto the back of a Bedford Truck or Queen Mary out to the job. Tried it at Ot Moor in the winter but it was no improvement. OK on the boggy groud but struggled more than the wheeled version through deep mud.

Jim Hope
21-05-2010, 16:23
Can I ask question. Saw a sgt from the Central Band being interview on brekkies tv (BBC of course) the other morning. I'm certain he was wearing an old style uniform i.e. it had a belt with the big buckle. Have they changed the uniform again?.

Was very lucky a few years ago. Just missed out on trip from Wattisham to St Eval in one of the old 32 seaters for a field exercise. Managed to get a lift in a soft top Triumph Herald. Not so lucky. Had to travel as 2nd pax from Henlow to Aberdeen in a LBW Landrover and this was before the A1 was upgraded. Guess who got to sit in the middle front seat. After two days I was numb from the bum down. They damned near had to carry me on to the ferry.

canberra
21-05-2010, 17:03
Yes they have changed the tunic again, only difference from the one that was on issue until the early seventies is only three buttons.

ancientarmourer
17-01-2013, 21:51
Bomb disposal jobs were always situated miles from civilization, so nobody gave a toss as to what we wore. In summer, the normal rig was trousers/shorts, sea boot socks and, depending on conditions under foot, trog boots or wellies. Oh, happy days.