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Engineer
31-10-2010, 15:34
Whilst looking for the elusive last of the five naval heavy fuel stores another small installation was passed on to me.
It is viewable on Streetview where it appears to be a small tank set-up, C2 or smaller, (not one of the naval 19,500 ton tank types).
Aviation fuel for aircraft carriers? Linked to the other site at Bolsowick?

http://www.flashearth.com/?lat=50.150855&lon=-5.052934&z=18.4&r=0&src=msl

This place also looks interesting, a bit like 'the mound' at Buxton.

http://www.flashearth.com/?lat=50.149766&lon=-5.046553&z=18&r=0&src=msl

Peter Kirk
31-10-2010, 17:16
I couldn't find any older maps that show the site to confirm. Also checked "Adolf Hilters's Holiday Snaps" and sadly now photo of Falmouth.

Engineer
31-10-2010, 17:37
Also checked "Adolf Hilters's Holiday Snaps" and sadly now photo of Falmouth.

I found this site this morning, no freebies though!

http://germaninvasion.co.uk/luftwaffe/index.htm#

From Streetview it looks well maintained so whatever its history I would suspect it stores 35 second diesel now.

Carnaby
31-10-2010, 19:25
35 second diesel
Please explain, Engineer :wink:

Graham

Engineer
31-10-2010, 19:58
Please explain, Engineer :wink:

Graham

Red diesel (or gas oil), the old viscosity rating was in 'Redwood Seconds', the amount of time for a set volume to flow through the test apparatus. Now changed to Centistrokes.

"an obsolete unit of kinematic viscosity given by readings on the Redwood viscometers commonly used in Britain and elsewhere. The reading is the time, in seconds, for 50 milliliters of a sample of a liquid to flow through the device. The viscosity in centistokes is given roughly by the formula 0.260 t - (0.0188 / t ), where t is the flow time in seconds."

Central heating oil is '28 Second'.

Carnaby
31-10-2010, 20:11
Thanks - I thought it might have had something do do with the amount of time taken to lever off a car fuel cap and siphon the contents into a jerry can, though 35 secs was a bit optimistic.

Graham

Engineer
31-10-2010, 20:25
Lateral thinking at its finest!

PETERTHEEATER
01-11-2010, 07:48
Now changed to Centistrokes.

That will be centistokes I hope:)

Engineer
01-11-2010, 22:00
Now changed to Centistrokes.

That will be centistokes I hope:)

Yep, bloody QWERTY keyboard!

mawganmad
01-11-2010, 22:44
http://www.flashearth.com/?lat=50.150855&lon=-5.052934&z=18.4&r=0&src=msl

My god, I was working on that ship above and to the left! It was the MV Buffalo which was cut in half, a new middle plug inserted, and the whole thing stretched to become the European Leader, they reckon it has had a permanant pull to port since!

BTW has anyone here brought those German photo packages from that site, if so are they a good deal?

Peter Kirk
01-11-2010, 23:38
BTW has anyone here brought those German photo packages from that site, if so are they a good deal?

I keep looking at that site and another (Nigel C Clarke) but haven't got as far as buying. Make a nice Xmas present from Mrs PNK - have to start dropping hints. Better than a Lynx Gift set :)

PETERTHEEATER
02-11-2010, 06:24
Them as uses Lynx, stinx. Get the pictures!

Engineer
04-01-2011, 13:56
Some pics.

http://www.derelictplaces.co.uk/main/showthread.php?p=176482#post176482

Pic 2 is the TEL barrel store.

http://urbandesolation.tumblr.com/post/2594749037/fuel-dump?ref=nf

CornwallPhil
19-10-2011, 21:36
It happened at Swanvale in Falmouth soon after midnight on Tuesday 30th May 1944. A 1,250,000 gallon petrol tank received a direct hit from an incendiary bomb. The tank was fractured (thus allowing the fire triangle) and the fuel flowed into the nearby stream. This river of fire with flames shooting 70 feet into the air threatened the houses downstream. The fire burned for 22 hours and led to a heroic effort by the firefighters. Eventually a bulldozer was used to dam the stream and divert it away from the houses. The guy driving the bulldozer (seen in footage with a fag in his mouth!) Philip Lee Bishop of US Navy received a British Empire Medal and a Navy and Marine Corps Medal from US President. A second bulldozer was brought in and the driver was again awarded the same medals. Because the fuel was for D Day (Falmouth was an embarkation port for the US 29th Division for Omaha as well as a number of Naval vessels) the whole fire was hushed up until 4th September 1944 when Herbert Morrison, the Home Secretary, broke the silence by praising the firefighters.

You can check out the action here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IChL89tweM4

CornwallPhil
19-10-2011, 21:48
The start of the thread shows the fuel stores for Falmouth Docks. There were also huge storage tanks built in the war at Swanvale (about 1.5 miles from Docks). It was one of these that was hit on the air raid on Falmouth just before D Day.
In more recent times (ie Cold War) a pipeline was laid from Falmouth Docks to RAF St Mawgan, and this had a pumping station in Swanvale, which has just been sold.
http://www.charterwood.com/default.asp?ref=S3570

PETERTHEEATER
20-10-2011, 06:22
But the fag wasn't lit Phil, just in his mouth for solace!

CornwallPhil
15-05-2012, 20:45
The Swanvale site is slowly being cleared, the tanks taken out and houses built on the site. A few photos from a walk around the footpaths today...
88608861886288638864

CornwallPhil
15-05-2012, 20:51
Some photos of the NATO pumping station built in 1984-5 to pump aviation fuel from Falmouth Docks to RAF St Mawgan taken from the adjacent footpath today.
88658866886788688869

Engineer
15-05-2012, 20:58
Thanks.

PETERTHEEATER
16-05-2012, 03:21
Thanks for the update Phil; the housing overspill was inevitable. Quite a lot of scrap value in the tanks I would think. I wonder if that was factored into the selection of the demolition contract cost.

MODS - This thread needs to be subsumed into FALMOUTH under Fuel Depots for continuity.