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Thread: Kedleston Hall

  1. #1
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    Default Kedleston Hall

    I'll not be surprised if this gets a zero-response but here goes. I've had a message left on Airfield Archaeology as follows:

    "Have you any information re a grass airstrip at Kedlestone Hall from where
    apparently Lysanders flew"

    That's it. All I can think of, without a serious rummage, is that perhaps a flight of Lysanders from an AACU used the Hall grounds on occasions. 6 AACU used Firbeck for a while, though may not necessarily have been that one. Ideas anyone?

    Chris

    Chris
    Last edited by Carnaby; 12-04-2011 at 08:43. Reason: title corrected

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    Senior Member Dobbins's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kedleston Hall

    I've never heard of it, though it could be possible. It's now owned by the National Trust, but I doubt they'd be able to help....

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    Senior Member PETERTHEEATER's Avatar
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    Senior Member Dobbins's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kedleston Hall

    Just found this. No mention of Lysanders, or aviation at all.


    A brief wartime history of Kedleston Hall

    In September 1939 Richard Curzon, 2nd Viscount Scarsdale offered Kedleston for use by the War Department. The offer was accepted in October, and Kedleston was occupied by several different units until 1946. Temporary wooded huts were built on the grounds (in what is now around the car park) and rooms in the west wing, ground floor of the Hall and the stable block (shown in the photos below) were requisitioned. The kitchen of the west wing (now the National Trust restaurant) was used as an officer's mess.

    From 1939-1940 Kedleston was a mustering point for the British Expeditionary Force prior to the French campaign, with forces coming from as far afield as India and the Middle East. Local troops mustered at Kedleston included the 2/5th Sherwood Foresters. This operation was eventually thwarted, leading to the evacuation at Dunkirk, some survivors of which also came to Kedleston for a short time.

    In 1940 there was bomb damage to the stables and pleasure grounds, with 17 bombs falling.

    From 1940 -1942 Kedleston was a training camp for no.6 Bridge Company Royal Army Service Corps & Royal Engineers.

    From 1941 - 1942 Kedleston was a training camp for the 90 Chemical Warfare Company, Royal Engineers. Other troops - for example paratroopers - were also trained at the hall. In 1942 the park was also used by the Home Guard.

    From 1942 - 1945 the hall was occupied by the Wireless Intercept "Station Y" - ATS, Royal Signals and Intelligence Corps. Intercepted wireless messages were passed to "Station X" at Bletchley Park for decoding. Approximately 500 women and 50 men were involved in the vital role of monitoring enemy messages in occupied Europe, and later Japanese messages too. American servicemen were regularly bussed into dances held at Kedleston Hall.

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