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Thread: Warmwell

  1. #11
    SuperMod P Bellamy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Warmwell

    Tie-down fitting at Deenethorpe:



    This particular example is 1.5" dia bar set into a concrete block, and was built into a "frying-pan" dispersal (laid 1943) that was later used as the lead-in to a set of loop dispersals.

    All the best,
    PB

  2. #12
    Senior Member mawganmad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Warmwell

    I don't agree with tie downs, I'm sure you wouldn't find them in grass with that pattern and in odd locations of the airfield.

    There are some of these just south of St Athans taxiway, caused great excitement for the locals!
    Turns out they are old aerial positions, with the supporting cables being fixed by the radius of fittings that you see the impressions of.

    I think the aircraft are parked in amongst them to get them closer to the trees for a degree of protection.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Richard Drew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Warmwell

    This was an active airfield at the time so I am not so sure it would be aerials? I remember archaeologist getting also very worked up about circles in some fields, they turned out to be tethered gypsy horses. I was doing a survey of air photos on Salisbury Plain and there seemed to be lots of houses. They were straw ricks. Its all in the interpretation.

    I suggested tie downs as they were the only thing I could think of at the time and I have to agree they could be something else. At Hullavington and many other airfields active and retired I have found concrete (5gal) tie downs. These would leave marks in the grass but I cannot imagine the station commander allowing yellow marks on his green grass.

    you can just see the the whole floor area of this brick? shelter is covered in them.

  4. #14
    Senior Member mawganmad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Warmwell

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Drew View Post
    At Hullavington and many other airfields active and retired I have found concrete (5gal) tie downs. These would leave marks in the grass but I cannot imagine the station commander allowing yellow marks on his green grass.
    Those tie downs appear everywhere, ASUs had hundreds of them and St Athan and Llandow still have many hundreds kicking about.
    The CO would have to put up with his bits of yellow grass to allow parking of aircraft on grass and the use of these 5 Gal tie downs.
    However they wouldn't still be marking the grass 50 years later and showing up on Google Earth, I doubt they would show in the original vertical.

    I would put money on those marks being an aerial location. They appear exactly like St Athans, it was an airfield at the time aswel, I think the aircraft are parked amongst them to be nearer the trees.
    the ones we have found have a small concrete base for the arial itself, and a ring of depressions around it where concrete castings held the supporting cables.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Richard Drew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Warmwell

    It is aircraft tie downs.





    Its the large ones like the above at Hampstead Norris.



    This is the position its in reference to the road junction which is behind the pile of bricks or the deceased electrical generator plant room below.

    Plant room as it was with an earth blast wall around it.



    The one I think it may be?

    So this begs the question 'Is this the only set of aircraft tie downs on a grass airfield'

  6. #16
    SuperMod Peter Kirk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Warmwell

    I had a look at the Warmwell plan and it doesn't show the tie downs. The fact that they match the ones in the pan drawings that P Bellamy posted is a good sign. As I said in an earlier post, I have seen these before but a quick look yesterday failed to find them. Many other grass airfields must have had them but perhaps not in this style. The ones I recall at Biggin Hill are probably post RAF and relate to the current GA scene.
    I suspect the Warmwell ones are unique in their current visibility and preservation. Maybe the beginnings of a tie down thread

    Sorry forgot to add that the fact they are not on the plan doesn't mean they weren't there

  7. #17
    Senior Member mawganmad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Warmwell

    Well I'll be jiggered, well done for confirming Richard. I've certainly never seen tie downs arranged like that in grass before, as PNK says, something to be looked into and a new thread started!

    BTW, I've never seen tie downs appear on any plans, be they in concrete or grass.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Richard Drew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Warmwell

    I found out last week that Warmwell had a Picket Hamilton right in the middle of the airfield and was dug up by the the quarrying operators, the local airfield group had no idea what it was and it was broken up and dumped!


  9. #19
    Senior Member PETERTHEEATER's Avatar
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    Default RAF Warmwell

    WARMWELL - Pre-war wooden lattice masts

    Revisiting, for the umpteenth time, the book Druids' Circle, I was looking for 'range' topics when this caught my eye.

    The author of the book, Wg Cdr (Later Grp Capt) H.W. Dean, AFC was based at Boscombe and Farnborough with A&AEE during WW2 and one of his tasks was to test the early air to ground aircraft fired rockets, then known as UP's (Unrotating Projectiles).

    He had need to set-up a very large target screen at which to fire the rockets in salvo to check the dispersion but lacked the necessary 'masts' between which to anchor the target.

    He was visiting Warmwell to see the (then) CO, the well known Ginger Lacy, who was a friend. The CO lamented that Warmwell was being frequently attacked by enemy fighter bombers who were coming in low below radar and using two disused masts located on the airfield (boundary?) to identify their target.

    Wg Cdr Dean suggested that the CO might write the masts off as destroyed by enemy action but that he himself would arrange to have them removed and transported to his target area for use there.

    I will post details of A&AEE testing of UPs (Rocket Projectiles) in the range thread.

    The two masts are described as 'wooden lattice' and must have been around 70 feet high or more a deduced from the target size. The CO said that they were unused.

    So, this implies that the masts were either pre WW2 or early since the date of Dean's visit was late '40.

    The question is, what were the masts originally used for and where were they located? Something for the radar buffs I think.

    Incidentally, the masts were dismantled and re-erected at Larkhill Range but more on that to follow in the range threads.

  10. #20
    SuperMod Daveg4otu's Avatar
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    Default Re: WARMWELL - Pre-war wooden lattice masts

    I 'm sure these masts have been discussed before - some time ago - a year or more- if not here then maybe on Key Forums or somewhere similar.

    About all I can remember is that they were said by someone to have stood near to he eastern boundary of the field....beyond that I don't think anything else emerged.

    The thought that occurs to me is could the masts have been anything to do with the almost completed - never used- Moreton Admiralty Airship Station(N50.42.18 W02.20.26) which was located about 400 or 500yd N of the Warmwell airfield boundary?

    Would wooden masts have lasted from 1918-19 to around 1940?

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