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Thread: Temple Guiting

  1. #1

    Default Temple Guiting

    I have found this note on the web:

    RAF. 23 Grp. ELG
    Where was this airfield? Was it used?

  2. #2
    SuperMod Peter Kirk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    Haven't we covered this in another thread? ELG's perhaps. Search gets annoyed at three letters!

  3. #3

    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    I couldn't find anything on the search PNK....

  4. #4
    tigger
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    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    These two threads mention it:
    http://www.airfieldinformationexchan...temple+guiting
    http://www.airfieldinformationexchan...temple+guiting

    The first mentions a possible location

  5. #5

    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    Spooky I just took a picture of what I think was the ELG last week. I'll post details when I'm done unpacking from my trip.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    Thanks OEB, look forward to seeing more about the place.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    Right info as promised.

    First up a disclaimer - I don't have 100% proof of the exact location but this is all information I've tried to deduce from various sources and trying to join the dots and my knowledge of the local area. If anyone has anything more concrete then I'll gladly be corrected.

    Temple Guiting was a small area of land of 54 acres requisitioned by the RAF possible intended for used as use as a "scatter field". It's referenced in AIR 20/7260 which states it was de-requisitioned 29th September 1945. It doesn't mentioned when the land was first acquired although there is a reference in the No.3 Glider Training School (Stoke Orchard) ORB for 19th August 1943 which states that the Commanding officer visited the "Forced landing field at Temple Guiting" where he met two officers from HQ No.23 Grp.

    So where was it?

    The only reference I've found is an airfields list published in 1974 which states N51 57' W1 48' which is only a very rough approximation as far as I can tell. Looking at pre-and post-war OS maps for field boundaries and the general topography it's not possible the field that co-ordinate lies in would of been the site as it's too small - only 500 yards corner to corner.

    So I've tried to factor in some logic based on the following needs:

    - Needs to be flat.
    - Needs to be accessible by road.
    - It would need maybe 800 yards of length.
    - Probably east-west run based on local wind prevalence.

    So my best guess so far is the field at N51 57.164' W1 48.852' or SP128282. My guess is that it encompassed that whole field and possibly part of the field to the west. The hedge/wall between the field in fact doesn't exist and hasn't since the wall giving some credence to the fact the fields were combined at some points. Also if you add a little of the western field to the one mentioned, you get a nice land area of about 54 acres.

    Here are the other reasons I think it was this field.

    - It's fairly flat.
    - It has a road running along side it.
    - It has at least an 800 yard run.
    - It runs east-west.
    - Evidence of the wall/hedge between the fields being remove to extend it.
    - Fairly clear approaches without obstacles compared to other fields in the area.
    - There is what appears to be a broken up concrete entrance "apron" leading into the field from the road. (Visible at N51 57.259' W1 49.074' in the 1999 Google Earth imagery)
    - In the "1945" (actually about 1955) Google Earth images you can see what appears to be three small buildings at the edge of the field near the entrance "apron".
    - According to a wartime land-usage map it is the only field marked as grass pasture amongst arable farm land within about a square mile.

    Of course, I could be completely off - it could well be the field to the north on the other side of the road which offers a slightly longer landing run but I discounted it for the following reasons:

    - There are more trees around the perimeter than I'd like. Might be good camouflage for a scatter field but in a forced landing I don't want to be hemmed in by trees.
    - National Heritage Records show that on photos from 1946 that the field contained a "1943" pattern AA searchlight battery.
    - Within the immediate area is evidence of storage depots, possibly a radar/radio antenna and other buildings.
    - Gut feeling.

    So there you go. That's where I *think* it was.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    Hi, everyone,
    I'm new to the site, and I too have wondered where this enigmatic strip was located. At Ford Hill Farm, less than a mile from Oneeighthbit's suggested location is a building very similar in appearance to the armoury he mentions at Chedworth. I've not been nosey enough to ask the farmer about the history of the building, and perhaps it was shifted from Trafalgar Farm, or maybe the airfield was closer to Ford Hill. There are some fascinating bits of history on the site!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    Quote Originally Posted by OneEighthBit View Post
    Right info as promised.

    First up a disclaimer - I don't have 100% proof of the exact location but this is all information I've tried to deduce from various sources and trying to join the dots and my knowledge of the local area. If anyone has anything more concrete then I'll gladly be corrected.

    Temple Guiting was a small area of land of 54 acres requisitioned by the RAF possible intended for used as use as a "scatter field". It's referenced in AIR 20/7260 which states it was de-requisitioned 29th September 1945. It doesn't mentioned when the land was first acquired although there is a reference in the No.3 Glider Training School (Stoke Orchard) ORB for 19th August 1943 which states that the Commanding officer visited the "Forced landing field at Temple Guiting" where he met two officers from HQ No.23 Grp.

    So where was it?

    The only reference I've found is an airfields list published in 1974 which states N51 57' W1 48' which is only a very rough approximation as far as I can tell. Looking at pre-and post-war OS maps for field boundaries and the general topography it's not possible the field that co-ordinate lies in would of been the site as it's too small - only 500 yards corner to corner.

    So I've tried to factor in some logic based on the following needs:

    - Needs to be flat.
    - Needs to be accessible by road.
    - It would need maybe 800 yards of length.
    - Probably east-west run based on local wind prevalence.

    So my best guess so far is the field at N51 57.164' W1 48.852' or SP128282. My guess is that it encompassed that whole field and possibly part of the field to the west. The hedge/wall between the field in fact doesn't exist and hasn't since the wall giving some credence to the fact the fields were combined at some points. Also if you add a little of the western field to the one mentioned, you get a nice land area of about 54 acres.

    Here are the other reasons I think it was this field.

    - It's fairly flat.
    - It has a road running along side it.
    - It has at least an 800 yard run.
    - It runs east-west.
    - Evidence of the wall/hedge between the fields being remove to extend it.
    - Fairly clear approaches without obstacles compared to other fields in the area.
    - There is what appears to be a broken up concrete entrance "apron" leading into the field from the road. (Visible at N51 57.259' W1 49.074' in the 1999 Google Earth imagery)
    - In the "1945" (actually about 1955) Google Earth images you can see what appears to be three small buildings at the edge of the field near the entrance "apron".
    - According to a wartime land-usage map it is the only field marked as grass pasture amongst arable farm land within about a square mile.

    Of course, I could be completely off - it could well be the field to the north on the other side of the road which offers a slightly longer landing run but I discounted it for the following reasons:

    - There are more trees around the perimeter than I'd like. Might be good camouflage for a scatter field but in a forced landing I don't want to be hemmed in by trees.
    - National Heritage Records show that on photos from 1946 that the field contained a "1943" pattern AA searchlight battery.
    - Within the immediate area is evidence of storage depots, possibly a radar/radio antenna and other buildings.
    - Gut feeling.

    So there you go. That's where I *think* it was.
    OEB ~ We were taken on a tour of the area in 1969 and the field pointed out to us as the ' Condicote ' landing strip was in the field marked as 572 on your map.

    From memory it was on the south west side of the A4077 as you were heading west and it was after the entrance for Fox Farm estates on the right and just before you got to the left hand turning for Kineton Hill Farm that would then take you down into the Windrush River Valley.

    We were told that the land had belonged to the Temple Guiting Estate.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Temple Guiting

    Quote Originally Posted by Harboda77 View Post
    OEB ~ We were taken on a tour of the area in 1969 and the field pointed out to us as the ' Condicote ' landing strip was in the field marked as 572 on your map.

    From memory it was on the south west side of the A4077 as you were heading west and it was after the entrance for Fox Farm estates on the right and just before you got to the left hand turning for Kineton Hill Farm that would then take you down into the Windrush River Valley.

    We were told that the land had belonged to the Temple Guiting Estate.
    Nice to start talking to you! The field you refer to is a couple of fields to the east of OEB's suggestion, and coincides with the first reference I saw to the airfield from MAPS back in 1973, where they called the site "Temple Giuting" (sic). There is an airstrip currently at Condicote (Luckley Hill Farm) but this is a couple of miles North West of your suggestion. One thing I note that supports OEB's opinion is that during the 1930's a chap called Alan Peachey, who managed Trafalgar Farm, got himself a pilot's licence at Cheltenham. Maybe he had a private strip on his land? I know people who do contract work at Trafalgar Farm and have asked the managers about the airfield. They had no knowledge of it at all..
    ATB
    Hedgehopper

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